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Keiichi Morisato

Teen Electrocutes Herself in Bathtub with Cellphone

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Keiichi Morisato    417
Keiichi Morisato

Don't get me wrong. I have sympathy for the family of Madison Coe, a high school student who died after reaching for her cellphone while she was in the bathtub. Found by the tub was her cellphone, her charging cord and that she had reached for her phone. There were burn marks on her hand where she may have held her cell phone. But, stupidity surely runs rampant. The one thing everyone with any degree of intelligence knows is that electricity and water never EVER works well together and that you never reach for any electrical appliance or item while you're wet or in a bathtub.

While the feds are investigating the incident, what was found near the bathtub was her cellphone and the charging cord, leading to the idea that the phone was plugged into the wall and that someone from her family may have unplugged it before first responders appeared on the scene. Nothing, in my opinion, excuses stupidity. If you're in a bathtub, you do not handle electrical appliances or anything that is plugged into an electrical outlet.

What I also found ridiculous was that federal authorities are investigating. For what? Someone electrocutes themselves by reaching for an electrical item, ends up killing themselves, and the are investigating? It's really absurd. Anyone else find this totally absurd?

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/feds-reviewing-reported-electrocution-by-cellphone-in-tub/ar-BBEgdzO?OCID=ansmsnnews11

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Sugoi    46
Sugoi

*slaps forehead* ...that's like asking for it. Such a lack of basic common sense is truly unfathomable.

Well, perhaps this case will serve as a valuable lesson for other (incredibly) stupid people out there. After all you never you'll never stop learning in life...

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Keiichi Morisato    417
Keiichi Morisato

When I saw the news story, I thought that maybe a cell phone battery had exploded but after reading through the story, I was like "huh"? I've always thought that it was universally known, like common sense, that when you're in the bathtub, if your hands are wet, that you never EVER touch anything that is plugged into the wall. It's just common sense. This was something that I learned as part of school safety when I was in elementary school. Every elementary student (K-12), from kindergarten through the 12th grade is educated in the importance of safety, whether it's fire safety, home safety, even when you're approached by strangers. Every public school district in my country educates their students on the importance of school safety as well as home safety. It's practically mandatory and the public schools make it a point to educate students on this important issue.

I was just shocked that federal authorities were investigating it because I didn't read anything about the story that hinted that it was a defect of the cell phone. With all of the headline news concerning those exploding cell phone and laptop batteries airplanes, I think that law enforcement has become too paranoid about normal accidents. This is simply a tragic accident. One that could have been prevented had this young girl not had her cell phone in the bathroom, plugged into the wall, while taking a bath. If there's one thing that my dad always taught me, before he passed away, is that if a phone call is so important to the person calling you, then they will call you back. This young girl could have waited until after her bath before using her cell phone and she ended up paying for it with her life. That's the sad truth about it all. That this could have been prevented by the girl herself, or her family.

Electricity and water simply do not go well together, which is why you never get caught out in the rain when there's lightning. This is why you never want to be out in the rain when there's lightning, you never want to be soaked while messing with electricity, and you never want to be standing around metal rods when there's lightning. Unfortunately, there will continue to be accidents like these until children and their families start teaching their families better when it comes to home safety.

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Sugoi    46
Sugoi

As so often the problem lies between the ears...  Unfortunately there is no remedy against that.

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Keiichi Morisato    417
Keiichi Morisato

Unfortunately, I agree with you, Sugoi. Don't get me wrong, the loss of life is always unacceptable but you have to wonder why parents are educating their children better when it comes to home safety. Me and my brother and sister are products of the 1960's and 1970's, when home safety was important. Personally, I learned first-hand how dangerous electricity could be. My mom told me a light-bulb had broken inside the light socket, so iI tried to get the metal part out. It wasn't the smartest thing I could have ever done. The shock of exposing my bare skin to a piece of metal (the end of the bulb), knocked me off the chair I was in and tossed me flat on my back. The last I remembered was a bolt of pain being sent down the length of my right arm, from my hand to my shoulders, and it's a memory I will take with me as long as I'm alive.

It's just one of those life lessons that you never forget. I just think that the responsibility rests solely on the shoulders of parents and that it's their responsibility to ensure their children are being educated in the best possible manner. Heck, I remember my parents educating us in fire safety, home safety, what to do if a stranger approaches you. It was just a different time in the 70's, before the advent of the the internet, before everyone had computers and mobile phones and where not every family could afford a color television set.

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Board startup date: December 12, 2004 13:15:32
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