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Keiichi Morisato

Japanese Priestess Killed Over Shrine Succession

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Keiichi Morisato

What is being described as a brutal murder, has left one of Japan's few female Shinto priests murdered at the hands of her own brother, who used to be chief priest of the shrine before he was removed for unknown reasons. Nagako Tomioka, was returning home to the tranquil grounds when a man attacked her from nearby with an 80 centimeter samurai katana sword. She died from her wounds. Her brother, Shigenaga, was identified as the killer, aided by his wife, Mariko. She chased Nagako's driver when she finally met up with him at a supermarket and inflicted non-threatening injuries to Nagako's driver.

Shigenaga was upset over his sister being appointed to the position. he later killed his wife, Mariko, after the attack, and ended up taking his own life.

Nagako Tomioka was chief priestess of the centuries-old Shinto shrine in Tokyo famed for its annual festival and association with Japanese sumo wrestling. The Tomioka Hachimangu dates to 1627, one of the 82,000 such sites scattered across Japan. The particular shrine was established for the worship of the god Hachiman, the god of martial arts and war, according to JapanVisitor.com. The shrine was the site of the first sumo wrestling matches in the 17th century, and today monuments are located on the wooded grounds. The shrine’s Fukagawa Hachiman festival, held every three years, is one of Tokyo’s major events.

According to Japan Times, the leadership of shrines traditionally passes from fathers to sons. Only 10 percent of the shrine priests are women, making Nagako Tomioka part of a very small minority. And the Tomioka family’s relationship to the Hachimangu shrine stretches back years.

The brother and sister’s father previously served as the chief priest, Kyodo News has reported. Shigenaga then took over for his father in 1995, but the son was fired from his position in 2001. The paper cites sources who said financial problems contributed to his dismissal. At the time, the father returned to work at the shrine, and Nagako Tomioka worked in the second-highest role at the holy site. In January 2002, Nagako Tomioka consulted with police over a family problem regarding the succession.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/morning-mix/wp/2017/12/11/one-of-japans-few-female-shinto-priests-was-killed-in-a-samurai-sword-attack-was-it-sibling-rivalry/?utm_term=.17354275393a

This really is sad news.

  • Sad 1

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winedrinkingcritic

My faith in humanity has been taken down a peg or two. Murdering a female religious figure over her rise to power, by her own f--king brother. That has to be the most hypocritical criminal offense in the eyes of God.

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Keiichi Morisato

I had always believed that murders in Japan were rare. Where it concerns random killings like this one, I'm not so sure about gang violence. But to murder the priestess of a shrine and his own sister to boot. What's distressing is that his wife participated in this atrocity, and all because his sister was high priestess of such a prestigious and well respected shrine? This is just senseless since he was originally removed as high priests of the shrine over financial problems, which begs all kinds of questions. Hopefully, investigators in japan can find out what set this all off in the first place.

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Imaginos1892

I always say, since the dirt-bag killed himself anyway, why not do that FIRST and leave everybody else out of it?

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Keiichi Morisato

That would promote rational thought. When someone makes the commitment to take another person's life, it's usually with the sole purpose of gaining something out of it. Whether it's for material gain or just out of a sense of revenge. Having been a victim of a violent crime, I can assure you that they do it to exert power over someone else and mostly, just so they can self-gratify themselves. I was the victim of an armed robbery and while I wasn't injured, the person threatened me with violent injury. I've had to deal with his psychopathic wife and I can tell you that it's not a position that anyone should ever be placed in.

In this case, the suspect was angry that his sister was made high priestess, after he was removed from the position over financial problems that were his responsibility. Never let it be said that the Japanese are never impacted by crimes as violent as this.

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Sugoi
On 11.12.2017 at 6:21 PM, Keiichi Morisato said:

...used to be chief priest of the shrine before he was removed for unknown reasons.

I think it's pretty obvious now why he was removed...

Corrupted by greed (and his wife?) to such an extent...

 

On 11.12.2017 at 9:26 PM, winedrinkingcritic said:

My faith in humanity has been taken down a peg or two. Murdering a female religious figure over her rise to power, by her own f--king brother. That has to be the most hypocritical criminal offense in the eyes of God.

A priest in the end is but a human being too. Evil has many faces.

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